Daniel S. Hamermesh/ Katie R. Genadek/ Michael Burda: Racial/Ethnic Differences in Non-Work at Work

Evidence from the American Time Use Survey 2003-12 suggests the existence of small but statistically significant racial/ethnic differences in time spent not working at the workplace. Minorities, especially men, spend a greater fraction of their workdays not working than do white non-Hispanics. These differences are robust to the inclusion of Continue Reading…

Aurelian Craiutu: Faces of Moderation – The Art of Balance in an Age of Extremes

Aristotle listed moderation as one of the moral virtues. He also defined virtue as the mean between extremes, implying that moderation plays a vital role in all forms of moral excellence. But moderation’s protean character—its vague and ill-defined omnipresence in judgment and action—makes it exceedingly difficult to grasp theoretically. At Continue Reading…

Michael Golz/ Daniel J. D’Amico: Market concentration in the international drug trade

This paper investigates the industrial organization of the international drug trade. From the mid 1970s through the early 2000s, a few large-scale and hierarchically organized cartels dominated the market. Since 2006, dozens of smaller and more-specialized units have emerged. We notice that the prohibition efforts of federal governments (primarily Mexico Continue Reading…

Daniel J. D’Amico/ Claudia Williamson: The punitive consequences of organizational structures in England, France and the United States

We develop a framework for understanding how legal structures relate to imprisonment. We hypothesize that relatively more hierarchy within criminal justice institutions, compared to commercial law, fosters higher rates of incarceration. Our framework predicts that incarceration reflects asymmetric opportunities for rent seeking across differently organized legal institutions. Instead of comparing Continue Reading…